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5 smart lessons about investing to end poverty in Philadelphia

From Generocity: Despite Philly’s many cross-sector collaborations, local government efforts and discussions — prepare yourself for this shocker — ending poverty isn’t easy, which is why it hasn’t happened yet. Indeed, as panelist and GreenLight Fund Philadelphia ED Omar Woodard put it at ImpactPHL’s recent “Investing to End Poverty” event, it’s a Gordian knot. (Read more.)

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Struggles

From Philadelphia Weekly: I ran into an old colleague of mine recently who, like our publication, is a part of an initiative called Broke in Philly. Under anonymity he confided that there are problems even today that despite appearing to be on the level financially, are constantly holding him underwater. But he also noted savvy ways he’s staying afloat even though it inevitably comes to the detriment of his wallet — at times harder than he would like. (Read more.)

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Philly wants to teach retiring business owners how to sell — to their workers

From Philadelphia Media Network: On this bustling business corridor and transportation hub in West Philadelphia, most of the shops that have endured for two decades or more, the ones that solidified 52nd Street’s place as a neighborhood anchor, may soon disappear. Those owners, some of them well into their 70s and even 80s, don’t know whether their shops will live on after they can no longer work. (Read more.)

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Moving the needle on poverty

From The Philadelphia Citizen: When that happens, when the rhetoric of public officials rises to the moment, when it is informed by urgency and inspirational spirit, it underscores a fundamental truth: There is actually no reason that the birthplace of American democracy ought to be in last place when it comes to the economic security of its citizens. (Read more.)

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Soft skills, tech jobs: What Philly can learn from Albuquerque’s anti-poverty push

From Technical.ly: Why Albuquerque? Because despite how modest a 3 percent drop in poverty rates may seem, lessons can be gleaned from their local approach, which has been lauded by the Kellogg Foundation and the Obama White House. Given Philadelphia’s stubborn 25.9 percent poverty rate, and the lackluster results of current efforts, we’d be remiss to turn a blind eye to the lessons other cities might contribute. (Read more.)

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Seattle is the leader in worker protection laws. What can Philly learn as it considers a ‘fair workweek’?

From Philadelphia Media Network:
As Philadelphia’s City Council prepares to host a hearing Oct. 30 about its own version of Seattle’s year-old “secure-scheduling law,” known here and around the country as “fair-workweek” laws, here’s a look at what the city can learn from Seattle, thought to be a national leader in worker laws that aim to combat poverty. (Read more.)